Reading of Hector-Andromache Episode in Il.6.479-613

Wednesday, February 26 | 7.00 pm
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A close reading of the so-called ‘Hector – Andromache’ episode in Il.6.479-613.

by

Achilleas Stamatiadis

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This lecture will attempt to closely read an episode from Iliad’s Scroll 6 (Lines 479-613), famously portraying the separation of the Trojan royal couple, Hector and Andromache. Upon discussing the composition of Homeric epics, we will focus on evidence of an archaeologic nature interspersed within the Homeric narrative discussing works like ‘Homer and the Monuments’ by H.L. Lorimer (1950) as well as the more recent scholarship of Raffaele D’Amato and Andrea Salimbeti (2011). Ancient extracts from such texts as the: Homeric Hymns, Hesiod, Plato, Thucydides, Plutarch, and Virgil- will provide insightful information for a thorough analysis of the so-called “father-son extract” in Scroll 6. Scholarly views expressed in such works as the monograph “Sappho und Simonides” (1913) by Ulrich von Wilamowitz and Homer the Classic (2009), Poetry as Performance (1996) and Homer the Pre-classic (2011) by Gregory Nagy- will provide relevant insight – for an analysis of the “Homeric” and “rhapsodic” persona as well as Sappho’s Fragment 44 (P.Oxy. X 1232), pariter.

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Achilleas A. Stamatiadis holds a Bachelor of Arts in International Affairs with Minors in Political Science, History and Classical Studies from Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts. He is currently an M.A. in Classical Studies candidate at Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania. He has taken Classics and Comparative Literature courses at Harvard as a Special student, and has participated and completed Harvard’s Summer School Program in Greece. His research interests include: Classical Reception, Classical Mythology, Historical linguistics, Intertextuality studies, Papyrology, Ancient Greek and Roman Literature, Philosophy, Ritual Poetics, Baroque opera, Oral poetics, Socioaesthetics, Hellenistic novels, Comparative Literature, and Classical Philology.”

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